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dc.contributor.authorDannelly, Kenzi
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-06T15:21:23Z
dc.date.available2018-11-06T15:21:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/22381
dc.description.abstractMany young adult cancer survivors are not receiving regular follow-up care after they leave pediatrics due to lack of education about their need for cancer surveillance and communication between pediatric and adult providers. This study aimed to identify the gaps in defining a successful transition from oncology specialty care to adult primary care, the view of young adult (YA) cancer survivors. The findings presented here are part of a larger study exploring the successful transition in all YA cancer survivors. The specific clinical question being answered is as follows: How do YA childhood cancer survivors of acute leukemia (AL) define a successful transition to adult care? The inclusion criterion of this study was that the YA survivor had to be at least 18 years of age at the time of the study and did not attend the general oncology or survivorship program in the past two years.  The researchers conducted this qualitative descriptive study using audio-taped focus groups and individual interviews exploring themes that have salience for YA leukemia survivors during their transition to adult care. Investigators used a qualitative descriptive approach to analyze the transcripts of the focus groups and interviews. To allow for optimal data saturation, investigators conducted both focus groups and individual interviews. Nine of 30 (30%) YA leukemia survivors participated in this study and were a mean age of 29. 67 years at the time of the study and a mean age of 9.13 years at the time of their diagnosis. The survivors were a mean of 17 years from completion of their cancer treatment. The majority were males (n = 7). The survivors identified three major themes representative of their perceptions of a successful transition to adult care: Dialogue about cancer history (Communication), Provider handoff (Continuity of Care), and Teaching on long-term expectations, limitations, and necessary cancer surveillance (Education).
dc.subjectsurvivor
dc.subjecttransition
dc.titleSurvivors' Perspective of a Successful Transition to Adult Careen_US
etd.degree.departmentNursing


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