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dc.contributor.advisorTauber, Uma K.
dc.contributor.authorWitherby, Amber Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-30T18:13:18Z
dc.date.available2019-08-30T18:13:18Z
dc.date.created2019en_US
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/26786
dc.description.abstractStudents are tasked with learning a vast amount of information, and some of that information may be emotional whereas other information may be neutral. Critically, the kind of information that students learn can influence their study decisions and their study decisions can influence their memory. According to the agenda-based regulation theory, students set agendas, or goals that they want to accomplish while studying. There are a number of factors that can influence students¿ agendas (e.g., difficulty of the material, interest in material), which can influence how they regulate their learning. In the present research, I evaluated how people control their learning (via allocation of study time) of emotional and neutral information. Participants self-paced their study of positive, negative, and neutral words (Experiments 1 and 2) or pictures (Experiments 3 and 4). Participants made a judgment of learning for each item and took a free-recall test. For words, self-paced study times were not influenced by valence. By contrast, for pictures, students allocated the most study time to positive pictures, which were also rated as being the most interesting. Thus, when regulating learning of emotional and neutral pictures, students adopted an interest-based agenda, such that they strategically allocated the most study time to the most interesting information. These outcomes contribute to agenda-based regulation theory by demonstrating that students¿ agendas can be influenced by their interest in the to-be-learned material. Moreover, conclusions about students¿ self-regulated learning can be influenced by the kinds of material they have to study as well as the measure used to evaluate their study decisions.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.titleHow Do Students Regulate their Learning of Emotional and Neutral Information?en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentPsychology
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaPsychology
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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