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dc.contributor.authorBowers, Megan
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T20:41:25Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T20:41:25Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/26990
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the influence of adaptive skills on school readiness in children with Down syndrome. Participants included 12 (6 male, 6 female; ages 4-6) children with Down syndrome who attend a laboratory school serving children ages 2-6 with intellectual and developmental disabilities. To assess adaptive skills, parents of the participants completed the Vineland II. The Vineland II focuses on several relevant areas including communication, daily living skills, socialization, motor skills, and maladaptive or behavior index. School readiness was objectively assessed with the International Development and Early Learning Assessment(IDELA). The IDELAmeasures motor development, language, problem solving, and socio-emotional skills. Expressive communication skills (r = 0.7, p<0.05) and personal daily living skills (r = 0.68, p<0.05) had the strongest relationship to overall school readiness. Together, those two variables explained 48% of the variance for school readiness. Normative scores show participants were delayed in their expressive language, receptive language, and personal daily living skills. Occupational therapists are positioned to help children with Down syndrome and their families develop treatment programs to increase meaningful engagement and school readiness. One way to address this need could be through focusing on expressive language and personal daily living skills.
dc.subjectAdaptive
dc.subjectDown syndrome
dc.subjectschool readiness
dc.titleAdaptive Skills and School Readiness in Children with Down syndrome
etd.degree.departmentKinesiology


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