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dc.contributor.authorZirpolo, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T20:41:27Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T20:41:27Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/27038
dc.description.abstractAbstract I analyzed and researched three high profile corporate crises that occurred during the timeframe of my project (Spring 2018-Spring 2019). This study looked at William L. Benoit?s traditional image repair strategies and Tim Coombs? Situational Crisis Communication Theory to see how they function in crises faced by American corporations today. I researched each of these cases systematically to uncover the image repair strategies used in each case and determined whether the strategy was effective based on responses from the news outlet closest to the source. I used this information to develop original insight on the effectiveness of the use of traditional image repair strategies for crises in 2018 and beyond. The scope of this project focused exclusively on unintentional nonviolent crises. This particular focus interests me because of the highly connected, fast-paced, informational time we are in. A company or organization?s reputation (built over years or decades) can be tarnished by a single Tweet or online news article. I am interested in exploring how communication professionals respond for the inevitable. Are they ever truly prepared? How bad is too bad? In a highly connected world where there are essentially no secrets and very rarely does anyone get away with anything, how do companies manage to save face in light of human error? My systematic analysis includes a coding process guided by the image repair strategy chart outlined below. I looked at the statements released by corporations as soon as the crisis went public and determined the image repair strategies used throughout the course of the event. My systematic analysis continued with the study of news articles released by the source closest to the crisis (Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Star Telegram, etc.) and measuring the amount of time the story was reported in the news. I uncovered multiple trends and patterns among modern-day image repair campaigns and corporate apologies. I found information on what constitutes a positive image repair campaign and what American corporations are doing right (and wrong). Many of these findings are linked to the literature on the topic and some of them actually stood on their own as the result of human complexity that is not covered in existing image repair research.
dc.titleAN ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE IMAGE REPAIR STRATEGIES IN 2018
etd.degree.departmentStrategic Communication


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