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dc.contributor.advisorDansereau, Donald F.
dc.contributor.authorLabansat, Heather Annen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:04Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:04Z
dc.date.created2007en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifieretd-12062007-134539en_US
dc.identifiercat-001347371en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4001
dc.description.abstractPerspective taking has shown to be effective in creating new ideas, fostering cooperation, and helping people learn and recall new information. Since having the perspective of another appears to be beneficial; two questions arise, "Could an imaginary team of people promote effective perspective taking" and "How might this process impact learning, attitudes and behavior in regards to information that one is learning?" The current research examined these questions by using three different learning strategies: 1)a Learning Team/ Retrieval Team, 2) a Retrieval Team Only, or 3) the Control strategy in which participants used their typical strategies to learn new information. The Learning Team and Retrieval Team strategy had participants create an "imaginary team" of people whose perspectives they would consider while learning new material. Participants studied material and their test performance, attitudes, and intentions to engage in behavior suggested in the material, were assessed.^The results for test performance indicated that women seemed to be hindered by the Learning Team/Retrieval Team Strategies. Males using the LT/RT or RTO strategies did not appear to be hindered, and at least in the case of the RTO strategy, statements generated during recall were more accurate.There was an impact of using the LT/RT or RTO strategy on male participants' intentions and behavior in regards to the topic they studied: meditation. Males using the LT/RT strategy reported greater intentions to practice meditation than did males in the RTO and control groups. It appears that taking perspectives influenced males' incorporation of the information studied into their lives. Males using the LT/RT study strategy also reported performing more behaviors related to meditation than did male participants who were using their own study strategies.^Females' attitudes regarding meditation and their intentions or behaviors did not seem to be impacted from the use of the LT/RT or RTO strategies. Gender difference findings are discussed. Perspective taking while studying may provide researchers with another tool to facilitate attitude change, and provide educators with suggestions for students who are looking to integrate the information they study into their everyday lives.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAttitude (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshEmpathy.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMemory.en_US
dc.subject.lcshComprehension (Theory of knowledge)en_US
dc.subject.lcshLearning, Psychology of.en_US
dc.titleThink a while in my shoes: perspective taking, studying, and attitudesen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentPsychology
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaPsychology
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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