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dc.contributor.authorKernodle, Jayne
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-24T15:56:30Z
dc.date.available2020-08-24T15:56:30Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/40296
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Chronic Ankle Instability (CAI) on the postural adaptability of elite collegiate dancers. Participants included twelve (female, ages 18-22) dancers from the TCU School for Classical and Contemporary Dance (at least 5 years of dance experience and current training of at least 10 hours a week). The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool and the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score surveys were used to identify the presence and characteristics of CAI. Three participants were found to have characteristics of CAI. Postural adaptability was measured through 30-second single-leg balance tasks, altering task intention (static and movement) and feedback (no feedback and visual feedback) on a force plate. The results indicated a significant effect of feedback on center of pressure (COP) variability in both the anteroposterior direction (AP, p < 0.05) and the resultant area (p < 0.05). A significant task ? feedback interaction was found for COP-AP direction (p < 0.05) and area (p < 0.05). Providing visual feedback significantly increased the COP motion in the AP direction and area in the moving tasks, but not in the static tasks. These results demonstrate that visual COP feedback can be used to improve postural adaptability, especially for tasks relying on movement.
dc.subjectPostural Control
dc.subjectPostural Adaptability
dc.subjectChronic Ankle Instability
dc.subjectVisual Feedback
dc.titleThe Effect of Chronic Ankle Instability on Postural Adaptability in Elite Collegiate Dancers
etd.degree.departmentKinesiology


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