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dc.contributor.advisorWatson, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorMalloy, Riley
dc.date2020-05-19
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-24T16:07:08Z
dc.date.available2020-08-24T16:07:08Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/40340
dc.description.abstractPurpose: In contrast to the U.S., individuals with communication disorders in China often do not receive professional services due to inadequate or unavailable treatment opportunities (Battle, 2007; Cheng, 2010; Lin et al., 2016). Introducing home intervention strategies to parents and grandparents of children with communication disorders may be an effective and practical way to address the need for speech-language pathology services in China. The purpose of the current study is to examine cross-generational perceptions of parents and grandparents in China of home interventions strategies often used in the United States to treat communication disorders in children. Method: Parents and grandparents of children with communication disorders in China (N=86) were recruited at caregiver education events provided by the Bethel Hearing and Speech Training Center team to complete an online survey. The survey examined which home intervention strategies may be perceived to be most and least helpful in enhancing their child's speech and language and how likely they would be to implement them with their child or grandchild. Twenty-one strategies with examples of each strategy were included in the survey. Results: No statistically significant differences between parents' and grandparents' perceptions of the helpfulness of home intervention strategies were observed. Results of this study also indicated that caregivers perceived all strategies to be helpful in improving their child's speech and language and that they would be very likely to implement them with their child. However, statistically significant differences were found in the helpfulness ratings between some of the specific strategy categories. Finally, findings again indicated that caregivers perceived all strategies to be helpful in improving their child's speech and language regardless of the child's specific communication behaviors. Conclusions: Overall, the findings of this study reveal great potential for working with parents and grandparents of children with communication disorders in China through the implementation of home intervention strategies. Results of this study may be related to several reasons including the response group representing a clinically based cohort, caregivers' reduced understanding of the nature of their child's communication problems, or caregivers' deference to the expert who presented strategies as potentially helpful. Thus, current training models used with caregivers in the United States will need to be adjusted when working with families in China.
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectparent training
dc.subjectcross-generational
dc.titleCross-Generational Perceptions of Suggested Strategies for Children with Communication Disorders in China
etd.degree.departmentCommunication Sciences and Disorders
local.collegeHarris College of Nursing and Health Sciences
local.collegeJohn V. Roach Honors College
local.departmentCommunication Sciences and Disorders


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