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dc.contributor.authorSeitz, Shannon Jeanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:30Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:30Z
dc.date.created2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifieretd-04242008-142902en_US
dc.identifiercat-001362719en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4104
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed May 7, 2008).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2008.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, Charles G. Lord.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionPast research on the emotions associated with attitudes has investigated the extent to which specific types of emotions lead to actions (Seitz, Lord & Taylor, 2007). The present research extends this past research by showing that emotions engender a functional specificity with consequences for attitude-behavior consistency. In addition, the present research extends Attitude Representation Theory (Lord & Lepper, 1999) by showing that some emotions included in the attitude object's representation may involve specific action tendencies (reward/punish; approach/avoid) that result in consequences for attitude-behavior consistency. Experiment 1 employed an emotion manipulation. Participants were primed to associate either the emotion fear or the emotion anger with their attitudes.^Experiment 2 borrowed from the literature on prejudice (Cottrell & Neuberg, 2005), using social groups known to elicit specific emotions (African Americans: Fear, Activist Feminists: Anger).^The central hypothesis--that specific emotions associated with an attitude target can elicit specific behaviors and in turn result in better attitude-behavior consistency--was partially supported. In Experiment 1, participants primed to associate fear with Mexican Americans later reported relatively high levels of fear and concerns about personal safety, as well as relatively high levels of attitude-behavior consistency on approach-avoidance measures. Those primed to associate anger with Mexican Americans did not do so, but they did display relatively high levels of attitude-behavior consistency on reward-punish measures.^Experiment 2 replicated earlier findings that people associate more fear and safety concerns with African Americans, but more anger and threats to their rights with Activist Feminists.^They also displayed marginally higher attitude-behavior consistency with Activist Feminists than African Americans on reward-punish than approach-avoidance measures, although the attitude-behavior consistency results were not supported for behaviors toward African Americans.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEmotions.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAttitude (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshHuman behavior.en_US
dc.titleFight or flight [electronic resource] : the functional specificity of emotions and resulting effects on attitude-behavior consistency /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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