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dc.contributor.authorBednarz, Terrien_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:36Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:36Z
dc.date.created2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifieretd-04212009-141303en_US
dc.identifierumi-10023en_US
dc.identifiercat-001464899en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4124
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed May 5, 2009).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, 2009.en_US
dc.description"Dissertation presented to the Faculty of the Brite Divinity School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Interpretation."en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Carolyn Osiek.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionScholarly works on the Synoptic Gospels reflect a basic presupposition that the content of the Gospels is serious, and thereby, seriousness precludes humor. This dissertation demonstrates that humor in the circum-Mediterranean world was often serious, even deadly serious. The aim of the study is threefold: to challenge basic presuppositions regarding humor in the Synoptic Gospels, to construct a model that would aid in the recognition of humor in the Synoptic Gospels, and to explore examples of Synoptic humor. The discussion includes a survey of the types and uses of humor found in ancient Mediterranean sources.^Most notably tendentious forms of humor surface in recollections of agonistic exchanges between adversaries, or in status degradation rituals, or in harrowing triumphs over rivals.^In biographies, histories, philosophical and rhetorical treatises, and in theatrical performances of antiquity, folk-heroes and other renowned persons engaged in agonistic uses of humor in order to demonstrate superior wisdom, courage, virtuous character and honorable reputation. Essentially, humor surfaced as a critical rhetorical device for the acquisition and defense of honor, but not without cost. In the oft-public antagonistic exchanges of antiquity, successful uses of humor helped a humorist to garner public support, but such successes tended to bring public derision upon powerful rivals. Their subsequent anger and loss of face frequently led to violent, even deadly reprisals.^The survey of ancient Mediterranean humor reveals a basic framework for exploring and recognizing the forms, functions and effects of tendentious humor. This framework provides a model for identifying and studying the use of Synoptic humor within the cultural context of Roman antiquity.^Both ancient emic sources and etic perspectives inform the model. Etic perspectives serve primarily to elucidate social constructs such as honor, reputation, and character in emic sources, and they help to clarify the impact of humor on social constructs. In particular, etic perspectives include critical insights from social science and the sociology of humor. The model guides subsequent discussions on the forms, functions and effects of humor in several Synoptic examples.^Particular attention is given to the cultural context of agonistic exchanges between the Matthean Jesus and his opponents in the Temple precinct (12:12-23:36) and in the antagonistic setting of the Sanhedrin trial of Jesus (Luke 22:67-70; Matt 26:64).^Additional discussion situates Synoptic humor within the context of ancient oral performances, and provides examples of Synoptic humor that exemplify the kinds of humor that surface in the oral performances of biographical encomium and in the authorial commentary of in-group literature.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, TX : [Texas Christian University],en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWit and humor in the Bible.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWit and humor.en_US
dc.titleHumor-neutics [electronic resource] : analyzing humor and humor functions in the Synoptic Gospels /en_US
dc.title.alternativeHumorneuticsen_US
dc.title.alternativeAnalyzing humor and humor functions in the Synoptic Gospelsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentBrite Divinity School
etd.degree.levelDoctoral


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