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dc.contributor.authorKirkland, Melanie Anne Veachen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:41Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:41Z
dc.date.created2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifieretd-04292009-155533en_US
dc.identifierumi-10040en_US
dc.identifiercat-001467192en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4156
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed June 9, 2009).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of History; advisor, Mark Gilderhus.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionThe integration of women into the military establishment during World War II evoked a multitude of reactions from the American public. As over 500,000 women joined the military, they were met with support, skepticism, and condemnation. The attitudes of the civilian populace and the military establishment challenged women to expand social constructs of acceptable female behavior. As women gained a foothold in the military establishment, they proved to be a valuable asset to the war effort. Military planners initially envisioned women working in traditionally gendered occupations. As American males deployed to the European or Pacific Theaters, women frequently assumed unorthodox roles. Their experiences changed their perception of themselves and their environment. This study will explore the roles women assumed within the military establishment.^In addition, this study will examine the impact of the military experience upon the lives of female veterans.^Women entering the military enlisted in the WAAC/WAC, SPARS, WASP, WAVES, or the Marine Corps. Each branch of the military approached integration of females into the service in different ways and adopted varied requirements for enlistees. As a result, the choice of organization often reflected the educational and social background of the recruit. This study will explore the role of social class within the branches of the military. Finally, this study will include a brief synthesis of female enlistment in each branch of the service. Each branch of the military has published an official synthesis of female participation in the war effort. Collections of autobiographical histories have been published. Nevertheless, the historiographical record lacks an academic synthesis of women in the military during World War II.^The research conducted for this study includes primary and secondary source materials.^In addition, interviews with female veterans and collection of oral histories shed valuable insight into the subsequent impact of the military experience in the lives of American veterans.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen soldiers United States History.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWorld War, 1939-1945 Women United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWorld War, 1939-1945 Participation, Female.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen United States History 20th century.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen and the military.en_US
dc.titleDaughters of Athena [electronic resource] : American women in the military during World War II /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of History
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of History
local.subjectareaHistory


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