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dc.contributor.advisorLord, Charles G.
dc.contributor.authorMittie, Shanna Kayeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:44Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:44Z
dc.date.created2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifieretd-04232009-114144en_US
dc.identifierumi-10030en_US
dc.identifiercat-001465656en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4169
dc.description.abstractDirected Thinking about Facilitating Actions (DTFA) has proven to be a powerful tool for increasing intentions to engage in self-beneficial activities such as studying and exercising. Experiment 1 tested whether an appropriate (but not inappropriate) mental context can augment the effectiveness of DTFA, because an appropriate mental context increases the perceived likelihood (but not the perceived desirability) of the self-beneficial activity. When participants imagined themselves in an appropriate mental context for exercising (Rec Center) DTFA increased future exercise intentions. Experiment 2 tested the same hypothesis but also looked at different temporal actions, more temporal specific measures, immediate and delayed measures as well additional control groups that are important for understanding these effects. DTFA had no effect on exercise intentions, however, listing Directed Thinking about Episode Actions inhibited future exercise intentions. Participants who were high visualizers found exercise more feasible and desirable than low visualizers. Low visualizers overestimated their number of exercise sessions most after they had imagined themselves generating ideas in the library, and least with no mental context. High visualizers, in contrast, overestimated their number of exercise sessions least when they had imagined themselves generating ideas in the library, and most with no mental context.
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshThought and thinking.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSelf-control.en_US
dc.subject.lcshVisualization.en_US
dc.titleWhen mental context moderates effects of directed thinking on intentions to perform self-beneficial behaviorsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentPsychology
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaPsychology
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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