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dc.contributor.authorPennings, Jacquelyn Sueen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:46Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:46Z
dc.date.created2009en_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifieretd-04282009-134217en_US
dc.identifierumi-10034en_US
dc.identifiercat-001467191en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4179
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed June 9, 2009).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2009.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, David R. Cross.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionThe purpose of the current study was to test an intervention aimed at increasing nurturing touch in families with young children. The effectiveness of the intervention was also be tested by examining family functioning and child behavior problems. The intervention was comprised of a manual on the topic of touch along with specific exercises involving touch for the family to do in the home. The primary research objective was to evaluate the effects of the touch intervention on touch in the home, family functioning, and child behavior. Based on this primary research objective, it was expected that: 1) The families who use the touch manual will demonstrate better touch, family functioning, and child behavior outcomes than the families who do not use the touch manual; 2) Families who use the touch manual for a longer period of time will demonstrate better touch, family functioning, and child behavior outcomes than families who use the manual for a shorter period of time. The secondary research objective was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Touch Survey. The participants in this study were families who had at least one adopted child between the six and twelve years of age. Participants completed demographic information and the Touch Survey, FAD, and CBCL at two-months and four-months. The results indicate that the psychometric properties of the Touch Survey are promising, although should be revised based prior to future use. The results also indicate that the family and child demographics have a larger effect on data between intervention and no intervention outcomes. However, it was found that touch and family functioning improve for participants who have been in the intervention for a longer time period. Implications, limitations, and ideas for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTouch Therapeutic use.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNurturing behavior.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFamily Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChild psychology.en_US
dc.titleThe effects of a touch intervention on nurturing touch, family functioning, and child behavior [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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