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dc.contributor.authorKillingsworth, Vernon Blakeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialSouth Carolinaen_US
dc.coverage.spatialCharlestonen_US
dc.coverage.spatialCharleston (S.C.)en_US
dc.coverage.spatialCharleston (S.C.)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:17Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:17Z
dc.date.created2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifieretd-05042011-130754en_US
dc.identifierumi-10207en_US
dc.identifiercat-001676046en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4322
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed May 6, 2011).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of History; advisor, Steven E. Woodworth.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionThis dissertation explores the religious world of the pre-war United States South. In particular, it focuses on a specific group from 1847-1850, Baptists living in Charleston, South Carolina, and attempts to locate the presence of both southern nationalism and evangelical providentialism. In order to study this group, effort has been made to examine the main newspaper for Baptists in South Carolina, the Southern Baptist, which was printed weekly in Charleston from 1839-1860. The paper enjoyed a stable circulation during the 1850s and provides a window through which one can explore not only the thoughts and actions of Baptist leaders, but also individual Baptists who chose to receive the paper. In addition to the paper, effort has been made to explore the sermons preached and hymns sung in Charleston throughout the 1850s. The study concludes that in order for historians to properly discuss the post-war marriage of religious rhetoric and Confederate memory and the church's description of the loss as a chastisement from God for the greater glory of the South, one has to also understand that prior to the war, Baptist groups, as well as other evangelicals, made the same arguments concerning various other afflictions from God, including disease, war, and death. This focus on God as an afflicter of people, combined with a staunch southern nationalism that developed in the 1850s, forms the soil from which would eventually grow what Charles Reagan Wilson coined the "religion of the lost cause."en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSouthern Baptist.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBaptists South Carolina Charleston History 19th century.en_US
dc.subject.lcshProvidence and government of God.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCharleston (S.C.) Religious life and customs.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCharleston (S.C.) Newspapers.en_US
dc.title'Tis God that afflicts you [electronic resource] : the roots of religion of the lost cause among Charleston Baptists, 1847-1861 /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of History
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of History


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