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dc.contributor.authorOrtega Murillo, Leonardo Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:19Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:19Z
dc.date.created2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifieretd-03212011-120808en_US
dc.identifierumi-10192en_US
dc.identifiercat-001666422en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4340
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Mar. 24, 2011).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, Mauricio R. Papini.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionThe present experiments were designed to determine whether bilateral electrolytic lesions on three prefrontal areas, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLO), and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), modulate performance during reward downshift. ACC lesions retarded the recovery from a type of reward downshift, consummatory successive negative contrast (cSNC). VLO lesions had a small effect, in that they decreased cSNC during the late part of the downshift trial. There was no evidence that mPFC lesions played a role on cSNC, although they disrupted consummatory behavior and sucrose preference. Further testing showed that VLO lesions did not have effects on sucrose preference, but affected autoshaping acquisition under partial reinforcement. The present experiments, together with previous research, suggest that the ACC and the insular cortex are critical areas within the prefrontal cortex for the control of the response to and the recovery from cSNC.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshReward (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshRats Behavior.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRats Physiology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPrefrontal cortex.en_US
dc.titleBehavioral consequences of reward downshift [electronic resource] : role of the prefrontal cortex /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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