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dc.contributor.advisorFlynn, Patrick M.
dc.contributor.authorCherry, Aaron Michaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:28Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:28Z
dc.date.created2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifierUMI thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-07312012-131016en_US
dc.identifierumi-10339en_US
dc.identifiercat-001840582en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4385
dc.description.abstractResearch suggests that motivation for drug abuse treatment increases as psychological and social problems increase, but decreases as criminal thinking increases. Despite these two constructs having opposing influences on motivation, they are positively correlated such that high amounts of one are associated with high amounts of the other. The current study demonstrated these confounding relationships in a large data set including 7,623 men and women from 8 correctional-based treatment centers from two states. Although the hypothesis that criminal thinking would moderate the psychosocial dysfunction--treatment motivation relationship was not strongly supported, two revealing findings presented themselves. First, criminal thinking and psychosocial dysfunction differentially predict different stages of treatment motivation. Secondly, suppression effects reveal that most of the relationship between psychosocial dysfunction and criminal thinking is unrelated to treatment motivation, and thus their high correlation with each other and inverse relationships to motivation are less challenging. Implications for treatment are discussed.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleInfluences of criminal thinking on the relationship between psychosocial dysfunction and treatment motivationen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentPsychology
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
dc.type.genreThesis
local.subjectareaPsychology
etd.degree.nameMaster of Arts


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