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dc.contributor.authorKeating, Amy Theresaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:38Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:38Z
dc.date.created2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-05232012-093312en_US
dc.identifierumi-10317en_US
dc.identifiercat-001830501en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4406
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed June 12, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionCollege of Communication; advisor, Andrew M. Ledbetter.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study considered the relationship between everyday talk and communication media, geographic distance, and closeness in the context of friendships. Participants included 213 adults from two colleges and those collected from the site Facebook.com. All participants completed surveys which included questions on their everyday talk use with friends across Facebook and face-to-face media, along with self-reports of closeness, relational length, and geographic distance of those friendships. Pearson's product-moment correlations supported both hypotheses, suggesting friends' use of Facebook and face-to-face everyday talk is positively associated with closeness. A series of Hotelling's t-tests for correlated correlations showed a stronger correlation between closeness and face-to-face everyday talk than closeness and Facebook everyday talk. These results showed the different types of everyday talk that friends engage in, specifically that long-distance friends were more likely to use Facebook task, relational, deep, superficial, and informal everyday talk in their relationship. A series of 2 (participant sex) X 2 (communication media) repeated measures of analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were also run. One ANCOVA was conducted for each of the five everyday talk types, showing five significant interaction effects between medium and distance. Specifically, local friends engaged in more Facebook everyday talk whereas long-distance friends engaged in more face-to-face everyday talk, clarifying previous nonsignificant findings between distance and relationship characteristics.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleHow do we keep in touch? [electronic resource] : Facebook, everyday talk, and friends' geographic distance /en_US
dc.title.alternativeEveryday talken_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentCollege of Communication
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.academicunitBob Schieffer College of Communication
local.subjectareaCommunication Studies


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