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dc.contributor.authorMelchiors, Maartje L.Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:39Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:39Z
dc.date.created2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-04302012-093031en_US
dc.identifierumi-10292en_US
dc.identifiercat-001816170en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4413
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed Apr. 30, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Geology, Energy, and the Environment; advisor, Michael Slattery.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the past century the Brazos River, the third largest river in Texas, has become a highly managed system due to the construction of dams and reservoirs. Currently the river provides seven billion gallons of water each year to surrounding cities, agriculture and industry. Impoundments along the river and increased water allocation have changed the magnitude and frequency of the flow, and thereby disrupted the natural hydrologic cycle. To date, numerous studies have reported on the fragmentation of major fluvial systems within the United States and the subsequent impact on sediment discharge. Similar studies along the Brazos River are scarce. This paper discusses the results of a one-year study examining sediment transport rates and channel bar morphology in the Brazos River near Glen Rose, Texas. All observations were made along a study site located below De Cordova Bend Dam at Lake Granbury. The project aimed at understanding the historic migration patterns of channel bars pre- and post-dam construction. This was achieved through the analysis of aerial photography and GIS. Additionally, the project monitored present sediment flux and channel bar response to understand short term changes within the system. Suspended load and bedload were measured over a range of flow conditions, and channel bars surveyed continuously to capture seasonal variability. Channel bar development is largely controlled by stream capacity and the availability of sediment, and therefore channel bars within our study area represent key observational features for understanding the current dynamics of the fluvial system. Results from this study indicate how this reach of the Brazos River has responded to the construction of a major impoundment, and how current conditions are shaping the channel morphology.en_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleAssessing sediment dynamics and channel bar repsonse in the Brazos River near Glen Rose, Texas [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.title.alternativeAssessing sediment dynamics and channel bar response in the Brazos River near Glen Rose, Texasen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Geology, Energy, and the Environment
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.academicunitSchool of Geology, Energy and the Environment


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