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dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Kaitlin Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:49:02Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:49:02Z
dc.date.created2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-08082013-092842en_US
dc.identifierumi-10385en_US
dc.identifiercat-002008220en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4489
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed Aug. 16, 2013).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCollege of Communication; advisor, Paul Schrodt.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explored young adult siblings' use of confirming behaviors as a moderator of sibling rivalry and relational outcomes in the sibling relationship (i.e., closeness and satisfaction). Participants included 329 young adults who completed online questionnaires concerning their perceptions of their sibling relationship, including their parents' treatment of them and their siblings, sibling confirmation, sibling challenge, and closeness and satisfaction with the sibling relationship. Bivariate correlations supported the hypothesized negative associations among perceptions of parents' differential treatment (i.e., an indicator of rivalry) and sibling confirmation, challenge, closeness, and satisfaction, as well as the positive associations among sibling confirmation, challenge, closeness, and satisfaction. Multivariate tests were conducted separately for participants' perceptions of differential parental treatment that favored them and/or their siblings, and the results of these tests provided partial support for the hypothesis that sibling confirmation would mitigate the negative effects of a sibling rivalry on sibling closeness and satisfaction. Specifically, moderate to high levels of sibling confirmation from the target sibling helped mitigate the negative effect of parents' differential treatment of the target sibling on the participant's closeness and satisfaction with the target sibling. Among the more important implications of this study is the finding that confirmation moderates the negative effect of rivalry on the sibling relationship, but only when young adults report that their sibling perceives that s/he is the recipient of their parents' differential treatment.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleConfirmation as a moderator of rivalries and relational outcomes in young adult sibling relationships [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.title.alternativeConfirmation and sibling rivalriesen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentCollege of Communication
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.academicunitBob Schieffer College of Communication
local.subjectareaCommunication Studies


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