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dc.contributor.authorRoozeboom, William Deanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:49:04Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:49:04Z
dc.date.created2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifieretd-05212013-131147en_US
dc.identifierumi-10428en_US
dc.identifiercat-002008958en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4494
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Aug. 12, 2013).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, 2013.en_US
dc.description"Dissertation presented to the Faculty of the Brite Divinity School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Pastoral Theology and Pastoral Care."en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation director: Nancy J. Ramsay.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores theological anthropology through an interdisciplinary, critical-correlational conversation using a qualitative approach. In so doing, it asks how new lenses and layers of human identity and relationality might shape one's sense of self, sense of relationality, care of self, and capacity to care for others. Furthermore, it argues that one's capacity for empathy, compassion, and connection in (inter)relationships is directly tied to one's own attunement and connection with the various aspects of one's embodied self - (intra)relationship. However, often times pastors/pastoral caregivers do not recognize, listen to, nor care for one's whole (intra/inter-relational) self and negate the relationality with oneself and with others. Additionally, this study examines neuroplasticity within the embodied brain ecosystem and one's performative ability to "story" oneself holistically through the use of practices of wellness - attunement, nourishment, movement, rest and renewal, and relationships - as an intentional use of motor learning, motor training, and procedural memory. The research suggests that such practices have the potential to impact one's sense of self, relationality with others and God, and one's ability to care for others - and may induce neuroplasticity. Ultimately, this project presents four organizing categories, or constellation of lenses, for rethinking the human person consisting of: (1) multilayered, embodied ontology, (2) intra/inter-connected relationality, (3) performative and transformative capacity, and (4) prophetic teleology each of which mutually inform and reform one another in ongoing, dynamic ways. Taken together, this understanding challenges pastoral theologians and caregivers to ask how we might continue to develop our capacity to image Christ and provide care as we strive to love God, love our neighbor, and love ourselves in all our particularities.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, TX : [Texas Christian University],en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTheological anthropology Christianity.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNeuroplasticity.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHealth Religious aspects Christianity.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPastoral theology.en_US
dc.titleRethinking theological anthropology [electronic resource] : constructing a pastoral theology of wellness in light of the paradigm of plasticity in neuroscience /en_US
dc.title.alternativeConstructing a pastoral theology of wellness in light of the paradigm of plasticity in neuroscienceen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentBrite Divinity School
etd.degree.levelDoctoral


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