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dc.contributor.authorFox, R. Michaelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-23T14:50:36Z
dc.date.available2014-07-23T14:50:36Z
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifieretd-05132014-121208en_US
dc.identifierumi-10493en_US
dc.identifiercat-002155771en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/4531
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Jun. 23, 2014).en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, 2014.en_US
dc.description"Dissertation presented to the Faculty of the Brite Divinity School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Interpretation."en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: David M. Gunn.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractMalachi contains a substantial amount of messenger language, imagery, and vocabulary. When one uses a reconstruction of ancient Persian royal messengers to construct an interpretive lens for reading the text, it becomes apparent that Malachi exhibits a root messenger metaphor from whence the many individual metaphors and decorations derive. This presentation of the book suggests that Malachi's historical context is the early reign of Xerxes, a time when the Persian emperor was constantly sending royal heralds throughout the known world. Malachi's form is best seen as a royal message (from YHWH, the Great King).en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : [Texas Christian University],en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.rightsEmbargoed until May 13, 2015: Texas Christian University.
dc.subject.lcshXerxes I, King of Persia, 519 B.C.-465 B.C. or 464 B.C.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMessengers.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMetaphor in the Bible.en_US
dc.titleDon't shoot the messenger [electronic resource] : reading Malachi in light of ancient Persian royal messengers in the time of Xerxes /en_US
dc.title.alternativeReading Malachi in light of ancient Persian royal messengers in the time of Xerxesen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentBrite Divinity School
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitBrite Divinity School
local.subjectareaReligion (Brite)


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