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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Samuel Hardmanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-23T14:50:42Z
dc.date.available2014-07-23T14:50:42Z
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifieretd-05132014-120911en_US
dc.identifierumi-10490en_US
dc.identifiercat-002150671en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/4553
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed Jun. 10, 2014).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCollege of Communication; advisor, Andrew M. Ledbetter.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstract"Following recent interest in media multiplexity theory (MMT), this manuscript reports cluster analysis of different media use patterns in extended family networks and results of an experimental study examining how participants respond to hypothetical changes in media use (i.e., increasing or decreasing use frequency) by an extended family member. After contending that MMT addresses both media use patterns and expectations, I employed expectancy violations theory to consider the extent to which communication satisfaction and tie strength moderate evaluations of media use violations. Cluster analysis revealed five different types of media use patterns among extended family ties, and family communication patterns predicted group membership. Results indicated that communication satisfaction served as a more potent and consistent moderator of violations, such that, for example, decreased media use by satisfying communicators was perceived as negative and important (but less negative and less important when committed by unsatisfying communicators). Beyond highlighting possible outcomes of violations, these results commend the nature of the relationship as a motivating force for media selection when organizational norms are absent. Implications for studying media use patterns in interpersonal relationships are discussed"--Abstract.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleMedia use patterns, expectations, and violations [electronic resource] : extending media multiplexity theory to extended family communication /en_US
dc.title.alternativeMedia use patterns and expectationsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentCollege of Communication
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.academicunitBob Schieffer College of Communication
local.subjectareaCommunication Studies


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