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dc.contributor.authorBalters, Jason
dc.date2021-05-19
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-25T21:48:45Z
dc.date.available2021-10-25T21:48:45Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/49035
dc.description.abstractBackground: Many studies have observed caffeine intake of university students. Investigators have found that the majority of consumers who over consume caffeine were not aware of the FDA recommended limit of 400 mg caffeine/day. Purposes of this research were to determine the level of caffeine consumption among students attending Texas Christian University (TCU) and the perceived effects that users experienced related to sleep, stress, and withdrawal symptoms. A desired outcome of this research was to clarify confounding values of average caffeine consumption in the university population that varied from 124 mg/day to 228 mg/day in the existing literature. Methods: A survey questionnaire was created to assess the quantity, modality, and situational scenarios of caffeine consumption, as well as caffeine's perceived effect on sleep, energy, and stress. Caffeine withdrawal effects felt by students were also ascertained in the survey. The survey was administered via Survey Monkey® and distributed via the TCU email system to approximately 1000 students. Basic descriptive and frequency statistics were calculated using the Survey Monkey® software. Results: The 217 respondents were 76.5% female with 94% between the ages of 18-25 years old and 94.0% current undergraduate students. Of the total respondents, 70.1% consumed 1-2 caffeinated beverages per day, 66.5% used caffeine to help study, and 67.5% used caffeine to increase energy. Negative perceptions of caffeine's impact on sleep were reported by 30%; while 18.5% reported a negative impact on stress, and 73.7% reported withdrawal symptoms. Conclusions: The consumption of 95-190 mg caffeine/day by the majority (54.9%) of study participants was consistent with reported scientific literature. While only 1.8% of those surveyed consumed more than the FDA recommendation of 400 mg caffeine/day, reasons for this are unknown. Additionally, of the 70% who stated they experienced withdrawal symptoms, it is uncertain if these symptoms were indeed caused from the caffeine withdrawal or from another unrelated cause. It is advised that the research survey be revised to include questions that more acutely seek information sought in the stated purpose of the study. Further research regarding caffeine consumption by consumers is also warranted to better assist registered dietitian nutritionists and other health professionals when assessing diet and lifestyle habits of patients.
dc.subjectCaffeine
dc.subjectStudent Perception
dc.subjectStudent Habits
dc.titleDetermination of Caffeine Use and its Effects on University Students
etd.degree.departmentNutritional Sciences
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.collegeJohn V. Roach Honors College
local.departmentNutritional Sciences


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