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dc.contributor.advisorTrocchio, Robynen_US
dc.creatorWarfield, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-09T16:31:30Z
dc.date.available2022-05-09T16:31:30Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/52844
dc.description.abstractAthletes use psychological skills such as imagery and relaxation to decrease stress, cope with competitive anxiety, and achieve an optimal state of arousal (Hagan & Schack, 2019). There is conflicting literature around how both sport types and different genders use these skills in their sport (Adegbesan, 2009; Di et al., 2019). The current study analyzed sport type and gender differences in the use of relaxation and imagery in 117 NCAA Division I (DI) athletes. Participants completed The Deliberate Relaxation for Sport Survey (Kudlackova, 2011) through Qualtrics. Results found no differences in how males and females use relaxation or imagery in their sport. Additionally, sport type had a significant effect on the reason for using performance imagery (p = .012), specifically for mental focus for competition. This study supports the use of individualized intervention programs to best help athletes use relaxation and imagery in the most effective ways for their performances.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectKinesiology [0575] - primaryen_US
dc.subjectPsychology [0621]en_US
dc.subjectAthletesen_US
dc.subjectGender Differencesen_US
dc.subjectImageryen_US
dc.subjectPsychological Skillsen_US
dc.subjectRelaxationen_US
dc.subjectSport Type Differencesen_US
dc.titleDifferences in Psychological Skills Use in Division I Athletesen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.levelMaster of Scienceen_US
local.collegeHarris College of Nursing and Health Sciencesen_US
local.departmentKinesiologyen_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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