Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHill, Sarah E.en_US
dc.creatorCunningham, Katja
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-26T14:13:46Z
dc.date.available2022-07-26T14:13:46Z
dc.date.issued2022-07-26
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/54309
dc.description.abstractFear expression is thought to elicit solely prosocial responses from others. However, no research has yet examined the possibility that fear may also elicit harmful, opportunistic responses, despite sound theoretical grounds to expect this motivation in some. The current work sought to address this gap by examining the impact of childhood exposure to ecological harshness – a factor known to influence prosocial behavior – on the relationship between fear expression and prosocially or opportunistic responding. I predicted that perceivers from harsh environments would behave more opportunistically and less prosocially toward fearful people, and that fearful people would express less fear toward an observer from a harsh versus benign ecology. Results revealed that although fear elicited opportunistic responses in some cases (Study 1 and 2), behavior toward fearful people was not moderated by ecology. Additionally, fearful people expressed less fear in the presence of harsh versus benign observers.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectExperimental psychologyen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.titleFear is the kind-killer? The relationship between ecological harshness and fear expressionen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.levelMaster of Scienceen_US
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineeringen_US
local.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record