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dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-05T17:48:27Z
dc.date.available2023-06-05T17:48:27Z
dc.date.issued1981-06-03
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/58943
dc.descriptionLetter to Elo Wunderlich.
dc.relationOscar Monnig Papers (MS 124)
dc.rightsPrior written permission from TCU Special Collections required to use any document or photograph.
dc.sourceSeries III, Box 06, Davy – DeWitt County, 1940-1997 folder
dc.subjectMeteorite
dc.subjectDavy meteorite
dc.subjectDe Witt County (Tex.)
dc.subjectKyrisch, Raymond
dc.subjectWunderlich, Elo
dc.titleLetter to Elo Wunderlich, June 3, 1981
dc.typeDocument
dc.description.transcriptionDear Elo: Thank you for being so considerate and prompt in answering my requests. I went by Bob Brown’s place of business and he and I shared your letter and examined the specimens together. First let me thank you for marking the locations of the two meteorites on the map. They were certainly barelyinside [barely inside] De Witt [DeWitt] county! I thought maybe you would write and say I should send a map of the adjoining county! I believe the man who found the other one was Raymond Kyrisch. Is he still living? Maybe he he’ll spot another one some day. The black stone you submitted is a piece of badalt. This is a terrestrial rock of volcanic origing [origin]. it was at one time mined at the Knippa Quarry near Uvalde, and wad shipped all over the southern United States, mainly on the Southern Pacific lines, to be use se ballast railroad tracks. There are also gone outcrops of such rock along tho Balcones Fault, terminating in a big hill of the stuff southeastof [southeast of] Austin called Pilot Knob. The boulder from which your sample came may have been brought down from up there or in some other isolated occurrence. It does have a glassy looking mineral called "olivine" in it; there is one speck visible in the sample you submitted. But it is definitely not, a meteorite. The reddish brown material does have a. little f1% metallic iron in it, but eh backgroun dd [the backround] does not look like any meteorite. We have concluded it is probably from a pileof [pile of] grindings off an erary or carborundum wheel, such as you in machine shops. Or it might have been from some heavy grinding on a pipe lie project out in the country. At any rate, we feel sure it is artificial and not a meteorite. A woman farmer near Seguin has an iron metorite [meteorite] of about 180 pounds or better that her father brought out of Arizona back in the 1890's. She will not sell it to me. Do you want to go up there some time and try to talk her into selling? Best regards,


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  • Records of the Monnig Meteorite Gallery [2247]
    The files are arranged alphabetically, usually according to the location of discovery of the meteorite. The files contain correspondence and research material on the meteorites in the collection.

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