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dc.contributor.authorWolf, Joshua Earlen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-12T18:45:41Z
dc.date.available2014-08-12T18:45:41Z
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifierTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.identifierumi-10518en_US
dc.identifiercat-002173113en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/6057
dc.descriptionTitle from thesis title page (viewed Aug. 22, 2014).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis--Texas Christian University, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, Kenneth J. Leising.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstract"In the domain of visual perception, motion cues are critical for the success of both predator and prey. To evaluate the superiority of motion cues in conditional relations, we trained rats on a feature-positive discrimination within a newly developed iPad-equipped apparatus. During feature-positive training animals must learn to respond to a target stimulus (e.g., A) in the presence of a feature (XA+) but not in its absence (A-) Two groups of rats were tested with a visual stimulus (feature) and an auditory stimulus (target). Group Dynamic received dynamic (left-to-right) presentations of the feature and Group Static received static presentations of the same feature. The dynamic visual feature did not facilitate FP discrimination learning during any portion of acquisition training. Responding on tests with combinations of X and C revealed that rats solved the feature-positive discrimination largely by learning the predictive value of X, rather than facilitation of A by X"--Abstract.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleDo dynamic stimuli facilitate performance in a Pavlovian occasion setting procedure? [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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