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dc.creatorDeNapoli A. E.
dc.date.accessioned2023-10-19T14:39:48Z
dc.date.available2023-10-19T14:39:48Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/rel14060785
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/61147
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the emergent leadership of two female gurus in South Asia who have declared their status as Sankaracaryas (i.e., heads of monastic institutions) based on revelatory experiences. They have done this in order to change patriarchal monastic (akhara) culture and challenge entrenched ideas of women¿s inferiority in Hindu society. By combining ethnographic data and a gender studies-centered analysis of their narratives and teachings, I shall investigate the role and impact of gendered charismatic authority on modern women¿s monastic lives. Their self-declarations as Sankaracaryas profoundly break the conventional patriarchal mold for the type of guru women can be and the kind of authorized religious power they can have in this male-dominated role; thus, I term these gurus as "religious feminist influencers". I argue that the gurus invoke charismatic authority by emphasizing the immediacy of the personal realization of the divine, the potency of the female body, and religious emotions, such as radical love, as sources of revelation. By "performing [these] revelation[s]," they construct alternative ways of practicing Hinduism, defined around modernist ideals such as gender equality, inclusion, and women¿s rights. Moreover, they promote the normalization of women¿s institutional leadership at the pinnacle of the monastic hierarchy. ¿ 2023 by the author.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.sourceReligions
dc.subjectaffect
dc.subjectauthority
dc.subjectcharisma
dc.subjectequality
dc.subjectfemale gurus
dc.subjectgender
dc.subjectHinduism
dc.subjectmateriality
dc.subjectnarrative performance
dc.subjectreligious influencer
dc.subjectrights
dc.subjectsaints
dc.subjectSouth Asia
dc.subjects?dhus
dc.title"Everyone Drinks from the Same Well": Charismatic Female Gurus as "Religious Feminist Influencers" in South Asian Hinduism
dc.typeArticle
dc.rights.licenseCC BY 4.0
local.collegeAddRan College of Liberal Arts
local.departmentReligion
local.personsDeNapoli (RELI)


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