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dc.creator
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-12T18:12:02Z
dc.date.available2024-02-12T18:12:02Z
dc.date.issuedn.d.
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/63253
dc.descriptionNotes on how Oscar E. Monnig acquired the meteorite, appearance, and future studies.
dc.relationOscar Monnig Papers (MS 124)
dc.rightsPrior written permission from TCU Special Collections required to use any document or photograph.
dc.sourceSeries III, Box 06, Fort Stockton, Pecos Co., TX folder
dc.subjectMeteorite
dc.subjectFort Stockton meteorite
dc.subjectFort Stockton (Tex.)
dc.subjectMetallography
dc.subjectOdessa meteorite
dc.subjectOdessa (Tex.)
dc.subjectWidmanstätten pattern
dc.titleNotes on the history, hand sample, and metallography of the Fort Stockton, Pecos County, Texas meteorite
dc.typeDocument
dc.description.transcriptionFort Stockton History Oscar acquired the meteorite in 1964 from the finder, who had found it in 1952-53. Oscar had pursued the meteorite for years. History of the meteorite is in my possession. No Literature - Meteorite apparently taken by Oscar to Odessa Met. Soc. [Meteoritical Society] meeting, but never allowed anyone to work on it and even Huss apparently didn't remove any material. Hand Sample Figure of the upper surface to be included in paper. The meteorite is a flight-oriented individual. The ablated surface is roughly triangular 13 cm on a side. The lee side resembles a 3-sided pyramid with the distance from the center of the front surface to the tip of the rear being *10 cm. A zone of caliche covers much of the back surface, starting at the lip which separates front from back and covering "5 cm towards the back tip. Thread lines are prominent on the back surface, in places being visible under the caliche. They converge at the back tip, where the remnants of material which has bubbled and ablated from the meteorite are found. The corners of the front surface have had small pieces removed by both hacksawing and cold chiseling and two of the corners are marred. Marks are also apparent from where the meteorite was secured in a vise. One-third of the front surface retains the original fusion crust, with the oxidation crust buffed off in several places revealing the Fe, Ni metal. The most prominent feature of the front surface (Fig.) is the exposure of the Widmanstatten lines. This front surface was upright during terrestrial residence, as judging from the caliche. The exposure of these lines appears to be caused by the abundance of wind-blown sand present in that portion of West Texas. Similar wind ablation of the Widmanstatten lines is seen on Asuka 881164 (Yanai et al., 1993, NIP), where ice crystals were thought responsible. All in all, one of the most beautiful meteorites on the planet!!! Metallography I will have it cut and retain a piece for study. We will probably want to provide Wasson a piece.


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  • Records of the Monnig Meteorite Gallery [2247]
    The files are arranged alphabetically, usually according to the location of discovery of the meteorite. The files contain correspondence and research material on the meteorites in the collection.

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