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dc.contributor.advisorLavy, Brendanen_US
dc.creatorButterworth, Camden
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-10T14:59:52Z
dc.date.available2024-05-10T14:59:52Z
dc.date.issued2024-05-06
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/64314
dc.description.abstractEnvironmental education is gaining recognition as a critical strategy to reduce environmental harm. Education has been identified as a top factor contributing to people’s willingness to engage in environmentally positive conservation behaviors. Non-formal learning institutions such as zoos and aquariums can create and engage learners in species-specific education programming. Species-specific education programs can generate high public appeal and contribute to overall environmental conservation outcomes. This research assesses the perceptions of educators at non-formal institutions about their conservation education programs and reveals three key themes when designing and implementing successful education. These themes were 1) recognizing the importance of short-term programming, 2) empowering individuals through the development of their STEM identities, and 3) collaborating with local communities to develop ownership over their education. The results contribute to a growing body of research on effective environmental education and help promote species conservation and community wellbeing while contributing to larger education goals.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental educationen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental scienceen_US
dc.titlePerceptions of conservation educators on program effectiveness: a mixed methods studyen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.levelMaster of Scienceen_US
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineeringen_US
local.departmentEnvironmental and Sustainability Sciencesen_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US


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