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dc.contributor.advisorSlattery, Michael C.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jared Lemuelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-06T21:47:41Z
dc.date.available2015-01-06T21:47:41Z
dc.date.created2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifierUMI thesisen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/7176
dc.description.abstractUrbanization and the development of impervious surfaces have impacted waterways and associated riparian ecosystem functions. Surfaces such as rooftops, parking lots, and roadways generate large volumes of stormwater that can transport contaminants (e.g. nitrates, pathogens, motor oils, and heavy metals) throughout urban watersheds. Thus, urban planning and development is critical for remediating contaminated stormwater. Bioretention techniques, a watershed protection method, utilize landscape designs of planned slopes, basins, and filter materials to remediate urban runoff from impervious surfaces. This study tested the efficacy of three filter designs to filter two common pollutants nitrates (used in fertilizers) and <italic>E. coli<italic> (an indicator for pathogens) and to release filtrate for non-potable re-use. Results indicated that while there was no statistical difference between the performances of these filters, implementing bioretention techniques using a sandy loam filter design is a viable and economic best management practice for capturing, filtering, and utilizing stormwater from impervious surfaces.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTCU Master Thesisen_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.titleRemediating nutrient and bacterial contaminated stormwater via bioretention : a comparative anlysis of three filter designsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Geology, Energy, and the Environment
etd.degree.levelMaster
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentEnvironmental and Sustainability Sciences
local.academicunitSchool of Geology, Energy and the Environment
dc.type.genreThesis
local.subjectareaEnvironmental Sciences
etd.degree.nameMaster of Science


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