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dc.contributor.authorCrawley, Rachel Dawnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-12T21:10:02Z
dc.date.available2015-05-12T21:10:02Z
dc.date.created2015.en_US
dc.date.created2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/8314
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Jun. 4, 2015).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, Patrick M. Flynn.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionResearchers recommend increasing clinical attention to cognitive skill development for substance abusing youth to improve treatment outcomes, but little is known about cognitive improvement during standard substance abuse treatment. Also, studies indicate that youth in juvenile justice treatment settings, compared to those in community-based settings, may be at a cognitive disadvantage, but few studies have compared their treatment needs. To address these gaps in the literature, this study hypothesized that (1) cognitive functioning (criminal thinking, urgency, and planning) would improve during treatment, (2) youth in community-based treatment settings would report better cognition than youth in juvenile justice secure treatment, and (3) youth in community-based settings would improve more than youth in juvenile justice secure treatment. Data were collected at 3 time points (intake, 35 days, and 90 days in treatment) from 359 youth in 8 community-based and 2 juvenile justice secure substance abuse treatment programs. Hypotheses were tested by estimating repeated measures structural equation models. Results indicated that youth in both treatment settings showed improvements in decision making (planning) but unexpected increases in their criminal thinking and impulsivity in response to emotions (urgency). Youth in juvenile justice settings reported less planning at intake, a greater increase in cold heartedness, and a smaller increase in power orientation than youth in community-based settings. Findings imply that youth in juvenile justice settings have different treatment needs than those in community-based settings. More research is needed to determine the best policy approach moving forward.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCognition in adolescence.en_US
dc.subject.lcshDecision making in adolescence.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSubstance abuse Treatment.en_US
dc.subject.lcshYouth Substance use.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCommunity-based corrections.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJuvenile corrections.en_US
dc.titleAn examination of cognitive changes among youth in community-based and juvenile justice secure residential treatment [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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