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dc.contributor.authorCho, Yong Hyun,author.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-16T18:34:38Z
dc.date.available2018-05-16T18:34:38Z
dc.date.created2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifieraleph-004812006en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/21829
dc.descriptionPh. D.Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University2018en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation presented to the Faculty of the Brite Divinity School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Interpretation.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Timothy J. Sandoval.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionOnline resource; title from PDF title page (viewed December 1, 2018).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation originated from a question about why the rich are negatively described in Proverbs and Sirach where the causal relation of act and consequence is strong. When the act-consequence nexus is applied to the discourse of wealth and poverty, it is thought that the attainment of wisdom or righteousness leads to the attainment of wealth as a material reward for following wisdoms way. Based on this understanding, the rich who possess wealth must be moral and wise. However, in Proverbs and Sirach, the rich are implicitly and explicitly criticized for their immorality and folly. The negative sayings about the rich suggest that their wealth does not necessarily result from their good behavior. The sayings also suggest that the rich are not always better than the poor in terms of their relative achievements in wisdom and virtue. Many scholars have regarded the critiques of the rich as an inherent ambiguity of the act-consequence nexus or as an exception to the nexus. However, this dissertation argues that the wisdom discourse about the rich can be better understood by differentiating the rich from those who possess wealth as the material reward. In MT Proverbs, LXX Proverbs, and Sirach, the rich do not just signify individuals who possess economic wealth. The term rich expressed by [;;] in Hebrew and plousios in Greek functions as social-political leaders and as moral agents who are criticized for their immorality. Indeed, the rich are consistently described as those who fail to choose and act for the good, even though they have the moral capacity. Thus, the rich are functionally equivalent to other moral agents such as the wicked and the just in the books.en_US
dc.format.extent1 online resource (viii, 303 pages).en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.rightsEmbargoed until May 8, 2020: Texas Christian University.
dc.subject.lcshBible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible. Versions. Criticism, Textual.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWealth Biblical teaching.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPoverty Biblical teaching.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWisdom Biblical teaching.en_US
dc.titleWisdoms wealthy : the rich in MT Proverbs, LXX Proverbs, and Sirach /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
local.academicunitBrite Divinity School
local.subjectareaReligion (Brite)


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