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dc.contributor.authorWhite, Grace
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T20:41:27Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T20:41:27Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/27034
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has found meaning in life (i.e., a sense of life purpose; MIL) relates to many adaptive benefits such as increased mood, motivation, and goal achievement. Hope theory posits that individuals who score high on this trait will have a greater ability to plan for and execute goals. Studies have demonstrated that hope and MIL are positively correlated. Building upon this work, the purpose of the current study was to explore the associative link between presence meaning, hope, and the extent to which people set and achieve goals (i.e., goal pursuit). To do this, college students were recruited to complete three questionnaires over the course of the semester: (a) at the beginning, (b) in the middle (i.e., mid-term) and (c) at the end. Everyone completed measures of MIL and hope across all sessions; however, persons were asked to list their goals for the semester at the beginning while evaluating their goal attainment at the end. Mediational results revealed that individuals who scored high in meaning experienced greater feelings of hope. A heightened hope response, in turn, was associated with greater goal achievement at the end of the semester. These findings can be used in future research and counseling programs focused on improving goal pursuit and achievement.
dc.subjectMeaning in life
dc.subjecthope
dc.subjectgoals
dc.subjectgoal achievement
dc.titleHow Meaning in Life Affects Goal Achievement
etd.degree.departmentPsychology


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