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dc.contributor.advisorSacken, Donal Mike
dc.contributor.authorJimerson, Philip Breten_US
dc.coverage.spatialTexas.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialTexas.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialTexas.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:22Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:22Z
dc.date.created2008en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifieretd-12182008-161630en_US
dc.identifiercat-001423485en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4073
dc.description.abstractExamining whether in-house counsel for a mid-sized urban school district in the State of Texas constitutes a valuable resource or an unnecessary expense was the purpose of this study. Specifically, the study analyzed the true value of in-house counsel for mid-sized urban school districts in Texas via the case study method. The case studies were structured to examine four separate issues faced by a mid-sized urban school district. The issues studied involved students' rights to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures, construction and resulting disputes, personnel problems, and instructional controversies involving First Amendment rights.^The issues ranged from those where the mid-sized urban school district had no legal advice to situations in which in-house counsel was involved at each and every step.^When the mid-sized urban school district acted without legal advice in two of the four case studies, the result was observed to be violations of law and resulting contract disputes. The former could, and unless corrected, would likely lead to litigation whereby the mid-sized urban school district would face significant financial exposure, not only for defense costs, but also resulting damage awards because the school district would have minimal defenses available. The latter did, in fact, result in outside legal fees, litigation, and construction delays the inconvenience of which cannot be reasonably measured.^In contrast, when the mid-sized urban school district acted either with the advice of in-house counsel or directly through in-house counsel, politically charged and potentially litigious situations were resolved with no outside legal fees or litigation of any kind.^In fact, when in-house counsel was involved early and often, the challenges faced by the mid-sized urban school district quietly and quickly dissipated. Although measuring actual cost savings is difficult, it is apparent that the mid-sized urban school district likely benefitted financially from the absence of litigation, and perhaps even more so from the absence of lingering classroom distractions. Hence, this study reasonably supports the conclusion that in-house counsel is a valuable asset to mid-sized urban school districts.
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSchool districts Texas.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSchool boards Texas.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLawyers Texas.en_US
dc.titleThe demonstration of need, benefits, and outcomes of in-house counsel for a mid-sized urban school district in the State of Texasen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentCollege of Education
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeCollege of Education
local.departmentEducation
local.academicunitCollege of Education
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaEducation
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Education
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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