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dc.contributor.authorDeLapp, Nevada Levien_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:48:29Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:48:29Z
dc.date.created2012en_US
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifieretd-12062012-100426en_US
dc.identifierumi-10348en_US
dc.identifiercat-001902379en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4389
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Dec. 19, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, 2012.en_US
dc.description"Dissertation presented to the Faculty of the Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical Interpretation."en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation director: David Gunn.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile there is a growing body of literature focused on the ways in which the David story has been received throughout history, relatively little work has been done on the ways in which 16th and 17th century Reformed writers used the story of David and Saul for purposes of resistance or non-resistance to lawful authority. This dissertation fills this gap. Using a reception-historical methodology, it surveys five Reformed authors from the 16th and 17th centuries: John Calvin, Theodore Beza, the anonymous author of Het Wilhelmus, Andrew Willet, and Samuel Rutherford. All the while, it observes two interrelated phenomena. First, all of the authors surveyed find in David an ideal model for civic praxis--what this dissertation calls a "davidic social imaginary." Second, despite a baseline agreement over the davidic social imaginary, the authors also display two different reading trajectories when it comes to David's relationship with Saul. On the one hand, some within the Reformed tradition read the story as showing a persecuted exile who refuses to offer active resistance against a tyrannical monarch. On the other hand, others read the story as an example of active defensive resistance against a tyrant. To account for these interrelated phenomena of reading convergence and divergence, the dissertation argues for a two-fold conclusion. The authors surveyed are influenced both by their individual socio-historical contexts and by the shape of the biblical text itself. The stories of David and Saul in 1 Samuel function within a Deuteronomic frame conducive to the idea of the davidic social imaginary. At the same time, within the paradigmatic narratives of 1 Samuel 24 and 26 the text offers a key narrative gap that is never resolved. The story never makes explicit to the reader what exactly David is doing in the wilderness in relation to King Saul.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs a result, Reformed authors believing peace and stability can be achieved through non-resistance fill in the gap with the image of a passive, non-resistant David, while Reformed authors laboring under the perception of increased monarchical persecution and war fill in the gap with a militant, resistant David.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, TX : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.rightsRestricted access; Available for purchase from ProQuest/UMI.
dc.subject.lcshDavid, King of Israel.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible. Commentaries.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible Criticism, interpretation, etc. History Middle Ages, 600-1500.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible. Homiletical use.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNarration in the Bible.en_US
dc.subject.lcshReformed Church.en_US
dc.subject.lcshReformation.en_US
dc.titleWielding Goliath's sword [electronic resource] : 16th and 17th century reformed political readings of the David story /en_US
dc.title.alternative16th and 17th century reformed political readings of the David storyen_US
dc.title.alternativeSixteenth and seventeenth century reformed political readings of the David storyen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentBrite Divinity School
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitBrite Divinity School
local.subjectareaReligion (Brite)


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