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dc.contributor.authorGlueck, Amanda C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-10T18:20:43Z
dc.date.available2015-08-10T18:20:43Z
dc.date.created2015.en_US
dc.date.created2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/8633
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Aug. 26, 2015).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, Mauricio R. Papini.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionThe present experiments were designed to investigate transfer of tolerance to frustration between consummatory (cSNC) and anticipatory tasks (autoshaping and taste conditioning). The initial finding (Experiments 1-2) were consistent with the type of asymmetric transfer described by Glueck et al. (2013). In both cases, the cSNC task in Phase 1 influenced a subsequent task (one-way avoidance or autoshaping extinction), but it was not influenced by any of these tasks when cSNC occurred in Phase 2. Experiment 3-7, investigated the asymmetric transfer seen between autoshaping and cSNC. Experiments 3, explored whether the lack of transfer from autoshaping to cSNC was due to insufficient counterconditioning. In Experiment 3, the number of counterconditioning opportunities was tripled, and there was a nonsignificant trend towards negative transfer.^Experiment 4 enhanced the counterconditioning experience during autoshaping acquisition through the administration of naloxone and, also, yielded a nonsignificant trend towards negative transfer. Experiment 5, explored whether equating the incentives used during both task (sucrose pellets in autoshaping and sucrose in cSNC), would yield evidence of transfer, and here there was a nonsignificant trend toward positive transfer. Experiment 6 and 7 explored whether modifying the cSNC parameters would yield significant transfer. In Experiment 6, the number of preshift sessions was doubled to enhance the cSNC effect; however, this manipulation also yielded a nonsignificant trend toward negative transfer. For Experiment 7 the discrepancy ratio was reduced from an 8:1 to 5.5:1 ratio and then animals experienced a brief reacquisition under CR in autoshaping followed by appetitive extinction.^This experiment yielded a significant negative transfer during cSNC for animals with prior PR and downshift experience, and then these same animals demonstrated a resistance to extinction training (positive transfer). The results of current research presented in this document indicate that transfer is not as universal as Amsel (1992) initially believed.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStress tolerance (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshAdjustment (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshIncentive (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshStress (Physiology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshReinforcement (Psychology)en_US
dc.titleCoping with frustration [electronic resource] : transfer between consummatory and anticipatory tasks /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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