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dc.contributor.authorBroeckelmann, Nicole
dc.date2015-05-01
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-19T15:38:10Z
dc.date.available2016-02-19T15:38:10Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/10290
dc.description.abstract  Background and Significance: The Hispanic population is the largest and fastest-growing minority group in the United States (American Cancer Society, 2012). In this population, cancer is the leading cause of death which accounts for 21% of deaths overall and 15% of deaths in children (American Cancer Society, 2012; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2015). Female family members across cultures most often provide primary home care for ill family members. Many researchers have focused on caregiving; however, a gap in the scholarly literature exists regarding male caregivers in the Hispanic community.   Purpose: The purpose of this study was to address the clinical practice question, “What is the lived experience of male Hispanic family members who care for an ill female family member with cancer?” In addition to answering this question, this study will make basic comparisons to what is known about female caregiving in this culture.   Methods: The student researcher followed case study methodology to learn from one Hispanic family’s retrospective self-report about the husband and sons caring for an ill family member with breast cancer. The student researcher followed case study interview methodology to gain insights about the participants’ family dynamics and perspectives related to role reversals of both males and females in this family during the time of the cancer illness.    Participants/Sample: The student researcher served as the research tool to interview, record, and describe four family members’ self-report of the gender role influence during the family cancer illness of the wife/mother. To address the clinical practice question the student researcher conducted in-depth interviews of the male family members and the wife and mother, who was the cancer patient.   Findings/Results: The themes revealed in this case study of male Hispanic caregivers were “faith and God,” “close family bond,” and the “desire to emotionally protect one another.” The wife identified that her family was there for support during her illness, especially her husband and adult-age sons. Through her perspective, the wife included that her husband and sons faced difficulties of learning to do the household chores while maintaining the caretaker role. The mother also stated that it was difficult when her second oldest son left for his freshman year of college in a different state while she was still undergoing treatment because the two were very close. He described himself as being his mother’s moral and emotional support when it may have been difficult for other family members to provide comfort to her. However, she states that because her family is so close, they were able to get through her illness with each other’s support. Importantly, she includes that in addition to her familial support, faith guided her through this difficult time. The male family members’ perspective revealed that being a caregiver of their wife/mother was not an option, but just something they did when she was sick. All three participants spoke to the changes in the household including the males now cooking, cleaning, and doing the dishes, among other chores, so that the female cancer patient could rest. The student researcher made comparisons of these study findings with the selected theoretical framework on female Mexican American family cancer caregiving.    Practice Implications: Male Hispanic family caregivers can meet role challenges with a sense of responsibility and find increased family strength from the experience.Findings from this study have implications for health care providers who will guide Hispanic families when caring for an ill family member with cancer.  Culturally appropriate support strategies for male Hispanic caregivers can be based on insights gained from the study. The data gathered from this qualitative study can be used in other similar situations of male Hispanic caregivers who are providing care for their female family members.   Key Words: Hispanic, caregiver, male, case study, cancer  
dc.subjectHispanic
dc.subjectcaregiver
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectcase study
dc.subjectcancer
dc.titleCase Study of Hispanic Male Caregivers of Cancer Patientsen_US
etd.degree.departmentNursing


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