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dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Caroline
dc.date2015-05-01
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-19T15:38:31Z
dc.date.available2016-02-19T15:38:31Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/10381
dc.description.abstractDancers typically experience movement in their own body through proprioception while audience members typically experience dance performances through personal perception of the work. Through these means of experiencing dance, there is a dynamic relationship between dancers’ sensory responses to their proprioceptive experiences while performing on stage and audience members’ perception of those responses as they view the work and experience in the moment. Through research to complete this Senior Honors Thesis, I have worked to craft an experiential viewing for audience members through stimulation and awareness of the senses, via the dancers’ actions and responses as well as some key environmental factors.             Charles W. Rusch states in his article “On Understanding Awareness,” what one experiences in the present can be altered by what has already been similarly experienced in the past. Rusch also states that past experiences are constantly being reconfigured in our memories by present experiences. Applying this theory to dance performances, breaking the norm for concert dance experiences can change the overall perception of the work, creating a dynamic response in audience members. In this research, breaking these norms involved specifically crafting choreography such that dancers’ engage in a heightened awareness of proprioception in order to better create the link between their own proprioceptive responses and the audience members’ perception. Through academic and studio research, I explored specific ways of enlivening the senses of audience members during performance and building an environment that takes viewing the work outside of traditional performance parameters.             I crafted a dance based on my research of published literature in topics including the senses as systems of perception, kinesthetic empathy, mirror neuron research, and proprioception.  The result was a creative honors project characterized by breaking dance performance norms, a deepened performer/audience relationship, and a specific aesthetic stemming from movement derived from studio and academic research.
dc.subjectDance
dc.subjectPerception
dc.subjectProprioception
dc.subjectKinesthetic Empathy
dc.subjectSenses
dc.subjectPerceptual Systems
dc.subjectEmpathy
dc.subjectKinesthesia
dc.subjectAudience
dc.subjectDancers
dc.subjectPerformance
dc.title"...As You Will": Sensing Perception Through Concert Danceen_US
etd.degree.departmentDance


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