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dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Mollie
dc.date2015-05-01
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-19T15:38:37Z
dc.date.available2016-02-19T15:38:37Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/10420
dc.description.abstractBackground:   Although results are mixed, some research has suggested that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce the incidence of depression in certain individuals. This study surveyed college students between the ages of 18 to 26 regarding their omega-3 fatty acid intake and their reported symptoms of depression using a self-reported depression questionnaire.    Methods: The Institutional Review Board approved this study.  An electronic survey was developed to obtain information regarding depression risk, intake of omega-3 fatty acid containing foods, and omega-3 supplement use among students at a private university.  A convenience sample of participants provided informed consent.  Researchers assigned participants to quartiles based upon intake of omega-3 containing foods.  Data were coded into SPSS. Correlation between omega-3 quartile and depression scores were measured using Spearman’s rho.   Results: Participants (N=222) averaged 20.4+/-1.7 years old and were ~79% female. Approximately 82% were categorized as having no risk of depression, ~19% were at mild risk and none were categorized as moderate, severe, or very high risk of depression. There was no correlation between consumption of omega-3 fatty acid foods and depression scores. Only 19% of participants were high consumers of omega-3 fatty acid foods.   Discussion: Although no association between omega-3 food consumption and depression scores was detected, this population had a low incidence of depression risk. A sample with greater variation in depression scores would better evaluate if a relationship between omega-3 consumption and depression scores existed.   Conclusions: This study showed that this population consumes less than the recommended amounts of omega-3 fatty acids in their diets. In fact, only 9% of participants consumed two or more servings of fatty fish weekly. Due to the importance of omega-3 fatty acid intake for health, further research is needed to determine methods to improve omega-3 intake in this population.
dc.subjectNutrition
dc.subjectComplementary and Alternative Medicine
dc.subjectDepression
dc.subjectOmega-3 Fatty Acids
dc.titleRelationship Between Omega-3 Fatty Acid Containing Foods and Symptoms of Depressionen_US
etd.degree.departmentNutritional Sciences


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