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dc.contributor.advisorJimerson, Jo Beth
dc.contributor.authorJarchow, T. J.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-12T21:06:53Z
dc.date.available2016-05-12T21:06:53Z
dc.date.created2016en_US
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/10933
dc.description.abstractEffective turnaround school leadership is a difficult proposition even for the most skilled leaders, yet is direly needed to support student outcomes in Americas most challenging schools. The scale of the challenge is of epic proportions as 5,000 to 6,000 schools across the country are struggling, as defined by chronically low student achievement, and are eligible for school improvement funding. The purpose of this study is to examine turnaround leadership through a people-first, culture-based lens, providing turnaround leaders a potential road map to follow in their journey of doing the cultural work required with their educators in these turnaround schools. To this end, the study was guided by two questions: (1) To what extent do urban school leaders improve school culture for adults in a purposeful and intentional way during the initial stages of the turnaround process; and (2) how and to what degree do turnaround leaders use the accelerators posited in the conceptual framework to guide school turnaround? A qualitative approach, in which the rich story of three turnaround leaders in two schools, is used to answer these questions. Findings articulate that turnaround leaders combine purposefulness with their own unique natural leadership attributes to impact their adult culture in the initial stages of turnaround. Furthermore, the accelerators presented in the framework were each used by turnaround leaders at varying extents depending on the context of their school, the stage of turnaround, and the accelerators they felt matched their own leadership strengths. Additional accelerators, lying outside the conceptual framework, were uncovered for consideration in building a positive adult culture in turnaround. In addition, considerations for turnaround leaders, recommendations for districts, and suggestions for future research involving priming an adult culture ready for turnaround are discussed providing optimism to turnaround leaders.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher[Fort Worth, Tex.] : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEducational leadership United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUrban high schools United States Administration.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHigh school principals United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSchool improvement programs United States.en_US
dc.titleBuilding a positive adult culture in urban turnaround schools: a case study analysis of two secondary schoolsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentCollege of Education
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeCollege of Education
local.departmentEducation
local.academicunitCollege of Education
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaEducation
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Education
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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