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dc.creatorCentanni, Tracy M.
dc.creatorPantazis, D.
dc.creatorTruong, D. T.
dc.creatorGruen, J. R.
dc.creatorGabrieli, John D. E.
dc.creatorHogan, T. P.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-12T16:01:48Z
dc.date.available2019-07-12T16:01:48Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2018.05.008
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/26407
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1878929318300136
dc.description.abstractIndividuals with dyslexia exhibit increased brainstem variability in response to sound. It is unknown as to whether increased variability extends to neocortical regions associated with audition and reading, extends to visual stimuli, and whether increased variability characterizes all children with dyslexia or, instead, a specific subset of children. We evaluated the consistency of stimulus-evoked neural responses in children with (N = 20) or without dyslexia (N = 12) as measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG). Approximately half of the children with dyslexia had significantly higher levels of variability in cortical responses to both auditory and visual stimuli in multiple nodes of the reading network. There was a significant and positive relationship between the number of risk alleles at rs6935076 in the dyslexia-susceptibility gene KIAA0319 and the degree of neural variability in primary auditory cortex across all participants. This gene has been linked with neural variability in rodents and in typical readers. These findings indicate that unstable representations of auditory and visual stimuli in auditory and other reading-related neocortical regions are present in a subset of children with dyslexia and support the link between the gene KIAA0319 and the auditory neural variability across children with or without dyslexia.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
dc.subjectKIAA0319en_US
dc.subjectgeneen_US
dc.subjectreadingen_US
dc.subjectneural variabilityen_US
dc.subjectsubgroupsen_US
dc.subjectmechanismsen_US
dc.titleIncreased variability of stimulus-driven cortical responses is associated with genetic variability in children with and without dyslexiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holder2018 Centanni et al
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC-ND 4.0
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentPsychology
local.personsCentanni (PSYC)


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