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dc.creatorJordan, Soren
dc.creatorFerguson, Grant
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-12T16:02:04Z
dc.date.available2019-07-12T16:02:04Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-22
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/2053168016669743
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/26427
dc.identifier.urihttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2053168016669743
dc.description.abstractResearch on mass political behavior relies extensively on ideology scales. The majority of political science surveys use a unique, and potentially problematic, word to anchor the endpoints of these scales ("extremely"). However, political science has surprisingly little evidence on the effects of using this anchor over others. We utilize an older, but ignored, survey experiment on the 1989 American National Election Study (ANES) Pilot Study to analyze the consequences of the choice between using "very" or "extremely" endpoint labels. Theoretically, our results illustrate how a seemingly negative question anchor helps optimally measure a key concept (ideology) that is fundamental to understanding phenomena such as mass polarization.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSage
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
dc.sourceResearch & Politics
dc.subjectextremeen_US
dc.subjectideologyen_US
dc.subjectmeasurementen_US
dc.subjectpolarizationen_US
dc.titleExtremism in survey measures of ideologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.rights.holderJordan et al.
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC 3.0
local.collegeAddRan College of Liberal Arts
local.departmentPolitical Science
local.personsFerguson (POSC)


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