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dc.contributor.authorBarbara, Makenna
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T20:40:59Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T20:40:59Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/26976
dc.description.abstractUrban Heat Islands (UHI) describe a phenomenon of increased ambient temperature in densely built areas of cities as compared to rural areas. Impervious cover (i.e. asphalt, concrete, metal, and glass), appears to absorb solar radiation (including heat as well as other wavelengths) and reemit that radiation as heat. Urbanization and UHIs have impacts that range from local to global scales and can be found in cities of all sizes and climatic regions (Fernando 2013). This study focused on Tarrant County, Texas and analyzed changes in impervious surface cover and average monthly temperatures at four different NOAA weather monitoring stations over approximately 60 years in a search for signs of urban heat island effect. Temperature analysis indicated an increase in average temperature over the 60-year period. This study aims to determine whether that temperature increase is due to UHI.
dc.subjectUrban Heat Islands
dc.subjectUrban Development
dc.subjectImpervious Cover
dc.subjectGIS
dc.titleCase Study of Urban Heat Islands in Fort Worth, Texas
etd.degree.departmentEnvironmental Science


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