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dc.contributor.authorKloess, Maddie
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-25T20:41:26Z
dc.date.available2019-09-25T20:41:26Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/27005
dc.description.abstractThe current research investigated whether ovulating women were more attuned to subtle changes in mating related stimuli, such as facial masculinity, facial symmetry, and masculinity of gait, than nonovulating women and women taking hormonal contraceptives. Past research has found that ovulating women are more attracted to mates with increased levels of masculinity and symmetry as they are indicators of good gene quality. Our research expanded upon these previous findings by looking to see if ovulating women were also better at discriminating between subtle differences in such mating cues. To do so, we tested women?s discrimination abilities during both ovulation and low fertility phases of the ovulatory cycle. Currently, a sample of 240 college women is being collected: 120 who are natural cycling and 120 who are taking hormonal contraceptives. We predict that ovulating women will be better able to detect subtle differences in facial masculinity, facial symmetry, and gait masculinity in comparison to their nonovulating counterparts and women taking hormonal contraceptives.
dc.titleOvulation, Stimulus Discrimination, and Mate Preferences
etd.degree.departmentPsychology


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