Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBunker, Steven Blairen_US
dc.coverage.spatialMexicoen_US
dc.coverage.spatialMexico.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialMexicoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:46:40Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:46:40Z
dc.date.created2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifieretd-04202006-160810en_US
dc.identifiercat-001289116en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/3903
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Sept. 7, 2006).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of History; advisor, William H. Beezley.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionA rapidly accelerating consumer culture increasingly defined Mexican urban society during the rule of Porfirio Diaz, 1876-1911. The significance of this global process at a national level can best be understood within the context of the economic and cultural modernization drive of the Porfirian regime. It manifested itself in a growing domestic consumer market and manufacturing base, an evolution of retailing and advertising forms, and the social and cultural implications of these developments. This consumer culture helped to define the visual and social reality of Mexico City and other cities, influencing architecture, street life, and other public as well as private spaces of urban Porfirians. Equally importantly, its presence permeated public discourse, with consumer goods, institutions, and values providing the vocabulary and metaphors many used to help explain and understand the rapid changes that characterized their lives. In other words, goods and the language of goods gave shape and form to the abstract condition of modernity in which Porfirian Mexicans lived. Using both written and visual sources, this dissertation outlines the form, institutions, and several of the major actors creating this consumer culture. This includes tracking the rise and evolution of the cigarette industry, advertising, department stores, and modernizing crime during the Porfiriato.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshDiaz, Porfirio, 1830-1915.en_US
dc.subject.lcshConsumption (Economics) Mexico History.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRetail trade Mexico.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMexico History 1867-1910.en_US
dc.titleCreating Mexican consumer culture in the age of Porfirio Diaz, 1876-1911 [electronic resource] /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of History
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of History
local.subjectareaHistory


Files in this item

Thumbnail
This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record