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dc.contributor.authorCuellar, Gregory Leeen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialMexicoen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:46:41Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:46:41Z
dc.date.created2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifieretd-07052006-134224en_US
dc.identifiercat-001289821en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/3908
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Sept. 13, 2006).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, 2006.en_US
dc.description"Dissertation presented to the Faculty of the Brite Divinity School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical interpretation."en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Leo G. Perdue.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionFrom a contemporary standpoint, the journey experiences of exile and return in the Hebrew Bible present some interesting connections and parallels with other forms of social movement such as international migration and border-crossings. In terms of my specific positioning as a Hispanic in the U.S. Southwest, this dissertation intends to "read-across" journey experiences of exile and return. In terms of a reading trajectory, I first read the exile and return experiences addressed by Second Isaiah (40-55) across to the contemporary Mexican migratory experience. This reading project is theoretically grounded in a theology of the diaspora, which, according to Fernando F. Segovia, is a theology grounded and forged in the migratory experience of U.S. Hispanics. From this perspective, the Jewish Babylonian exiles and contemporary Mexican migrants are viewed as common human experiences of diaspora. Moreover, these experiences find expression in each of these groups' corresponding cultural literature. Thus, I propose to read-across this spectrum of cultural literature and compare the poetry of Second Isaiah and the Mexican immigrant corridos (ballads). In the end, this dissertation argues that the diasporic categories of exile and return in Second Isaiah can inform our reading of exile and return in the cultural literature of the Mexican immigrant and vice versa. In other words through the corridos about the Mexican immigrant experience, one is able to see that Second Isaiah is also a form of oppositional culture, serving as a sharp critique of the imperial system.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshBible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMexicans United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMexican Americans History 20th century.en_US
dc.subject.lcshImmigrants United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshIllegal aliens United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshCorridos Texts.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMexico Emigration and immigration.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited States Emigration and immigration.en_US
dc.titleVoices of marginality [electronic resource] : exile and return in Second Isaiah 40-55 and the Mexican immigrant experience /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentBrite Divinity School
etd.degree.levelDoctoral


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