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dc.contributor.authorGresky, Dana Prestwooden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:46:43Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:46:43Z
dc.date.created2006en_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifieretd-11292006-080806en_US
dc.identifiercat-001303887en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/3918
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed Jan. 5, 2007).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Texas Christian University, 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychology; advisor, Charles G. Lord.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionPrevious research on social facilitation suggested that women's mathematics stereotype threat might be alleviated by components of the test itself (Bond, 1982). To test this hypothesis, in Experiment 1, we primed the stereotype about women's math performance, and then gave men and women a difficult math test. In one condition, the format of the math test was intended to lead participants to believe that their performance was good, and in the other condition, the format of the math test was intended to lead participants to believe their performance was poor. Stereotype threatened women who believed they performed poorly on the test actually performed no worse than stereotype threatened women who thought they performed well. In Experiment 2, we primed the stereotype about women's poor math performance, and then gave the men and women a math test. In one condition, the majority of the math items were relatively easy, with some difficult items embedded. In a second condition, the majority of the math items were difficult, including items that matched those used in the first condition. We found that stereotype threatened women performed better on the matched items embedded in an easy test, than did stereotype threatened women completing the same items embedded in a difficult test. Theoretical and practical implications of the results are discussed.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStereotypes (Social psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshThreat (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen Psychology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMathematical ability Sex differences.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMathematics Study and teaching Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subject.lcshTest anxiety.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSex differences in education.en_US
dc.titleThat was hard! [electronic resource] : examining the effects of test instructions and content on women's mathematics performance under stereotype threat /en_US
dc.title.alternativeExamining the effects of test instructions and content on women's mathematics performance under stereotype threaten_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
local.subjectareaPsychology


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