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dc.contributor.advisorLord, Charles G.
dc.contributor.authorFrye, G. D. Jayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:46:59Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:46:59Z
dc.date.created2007en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifieretd-08312007-152855en_US
dc.identifiercat-001333245en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/3982
dc.description.abstractTwo studies tested competing hypotheses explaining an attitude change phenomenon. Previous studies have shown a relationship between memory errors and attitudes, where attitude change has been found to follow source monitoring errors of imagined events. It is believed that writing hypothetical scenarios of detailed, first person accounts of interactions with a target group member, causes source monitoring errors to occur where the imagined events become confused with actual events in memory. People often look to their memories for information when reporting their current attitudes, and errors in attitude-relevant memories are suspected to lead to altered attitude reports. A competing hypothesis may be that attitudes change online while imagining interactions with a target group member and that the observed memory errors are a byproduct of changed attitudes. Study 1 showed that attitudes did not significantly change immediately after writing hypothetical scenarios of imagined interactions, but did change three weeks following the manipulation when memory errors were found to have occurred. Study 2 showed that memory errors were not found following a different attitude change manipulation that resulted in a similar magnitude of change. Here, again, attitude change did follow source monitoring errors resulting from writing hypothetical accounts of imagined attitude-relevant actions. Together, these studies suggest that the memory error account is more accurate than a memory bias account in explaining the attitude change that follows imagining attitude-relevant actions
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAttitude change.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAttitude (Psychology)en_US
dc.subject.lcshMemory.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRecollection (Psychology)en_US
dc.titleAttitude change and source monitoring errors following imagined scenarios of attitude-relevant interactionsen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychology
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.collegeCollege of Science and Engineering
local.departmentPsychology
local.academicunitDepartment of Psychology
dc.type.genreDissertation
local.subjectareaPsychology
etd.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
etd.degree.grantorTexas Christian University


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