Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRinehart, Nicholas
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-24T15:55:28Z
dc.date.available2020-08-24T15:55:28Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-19
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu/handle/116099117/40246
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT In a distinguished public service career spanning over 40 years, Pleasant Porter provided adept leadership during a period of immense transformation for the Creek Nation. As a progressive Native American political leader living on the the shifting political sands of the 19th century Indian Territory frontier, Porter?s life fits within framework of a cultural broker. A cultural broker is best understood as a leader who bridges the cultural chasm separating two distinct political entities. With a bicultural education and Indian background, Porter spent his time in Creek public service vigorously advocating for the interest of the Creek Nation in their relationship with the U.S. government. Moreover, Porter proactively advocated for a series of unique policy proposals distinct from both the coercive U.S. government and recalcitrant Creek traditionalist faction. After the Dawes Commission continued to strip the sovereignty and citizenship rights from a Creek government wholly rejecting negotiation, Porter launched a successful campaign for Creek Principal Chief in 1899 with the understanding that the Creeks must sign a treaty and protect their rights. During his time as Creek Principal Chief, Porter dealt with the Crazy Snake uprising led by Chitto Harjo threatening his status as Principal Chief and future allotment negotiation efforts. Expanding his political activism efforts, Porter spearheaded the charge for the creation of a state comprising the former lands of the Five Tribes in the wake of the impending divesture of Five Tribes governments by the U.S. government. These efforts culminated in Porter?s service as President of the Sequoyah Constitutional Convention, a Native American led statehood convention in 1905.  Although the Sequoyah Constitution plan did not receive acceptance in the U.S. Congress, this movement endures as the most significant attempt at proactive Native American statecraft in U.S. History.  This thesis seeks to unravel the motivations and significance of Chief Porter?s Native American political activism.
dc.subjectNative American
dc.subjectCreek
dc.subjectIndian
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectOklahoma
dc.subjectFive Tribes
dc.subjectStatehood
dc.subjectSequoyah
dc.titleChief Pleasant Porter: Preeminent Mediator of Creek and American Worlds
etd.degree.departmentHistory


Files in this item

Thumbnail
This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record