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dc.contributor.authorVictor, Royce Manojkumaren_US
dc.coverage.spatialPalestine.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialIndiaen_US
dc.coverage.spatialGreat Britainen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T18:47:10Z
dc.date.available2014-07-22T18:47:10Z
dc.date.created2007en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifieretd-04272007-131311en_US
dc.identifiercat-001317666en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.tcu.edu:443/handle/116099117/4027
dc.descriptionTitle from dissertation title page (viewed May 15, 2007).en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes abstract.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University, 2007.en_US
dc.description"Dissertation presented to the Faculty of the Brite Divinity School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biblical interpretation."en_US
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Leo G. Perdue.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionText (electronic thesis) in PDF.en_US
dc.descriptionThe colonizers invaded the peoples and nations not only politically and economically but also culturally and emotionally. The tools of this invasion and the continuing domination over the colonized were not only militaristic and economic; they also included the developing of a stratified class structure, in which the colonized were judged in terms of their degrees of usefulness to the empire. Throughout the history of colonization, colonizers used education as one of the major devices to propagate their cultural values, ethos, and lifestyle among the colonized. The primary aim of the colonial education program was to create a separate class of people who were not only meek and suppliant in its attitude towards the colonizers, but also felt a degree of loathing for its fellow citizens. This class was formed mainly to establish an effective imperial administration and channel of communication between the colonizers and the millions those whom they governed.^Taking the colonial education system as one of the major analytical categories, this dissertation makes an inquiry into how colonialism functioned and continues to function in both the ancient and the modern world.By analyzing the role of the Greek gymnasium in Jerusalem, as mentioned in the books of Maccabees, from a postcolonial perspective, this study establishes a constitutive relationship between the colonial education and the formation of a hierarchical class structure among the colonized. More concretely, this study attends to the transition from the traditional Jewish educational system to the establishment of Greek gymnasium.^On the basis of the study of several texts--Ben Sira, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Philo, Josephus, and early rabbinic literature--the investigation seeks to determine how the institution of the gymnasium was used to educate the elites and enable Greek citizens, Hellenes, and Hellenistic Jews to function politically, ethnically, and economically within the larger Greek empire and particularly in Judea, by creating a separate class of the "Hellenized Jews" among the Jewish population.The dissertation reveals the continuity of the role of the colonial education system in the formation of a class structure among the colonized by exploring a similar historical incident from the modern period, the British colonial era in India and demonstrates how the British education introduced into colonial India in the early nineteenth century played a similar role in creating a distinct class of the "Brown Englishmen" among the Indians.^The present study not only examines similarities and differences between the Hellenistic education program in Israel and the British colonial education system in India, but it also demonstrates how postcolonial historiography provides insight into the policies of cultural infusion adopted by Hellenistic empires. In particular, the study of the expansion of Greek education in Hellenistic empires offers valuable insight into the cultural and political role of colonial education in modern forms of colonialism.en_US
dc.format.mediumFormat: Onlineen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFort Worth, Tex. : Texas Christian University,en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTexas Christian University dissertation.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUMI thesis.en_US
dc.relation.requiresMode of access: World Wide Web.en_US
dc.relation.requiresSystem requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJews Civilization Greek influences.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJews History 586 B.C.-70 A.D.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJudaism History Post-exilic period, 586 B.C.-210 A.D.en_US
dc.subject.lcshJews Education History.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHellenism.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSocial classes Palestine.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEducation India History.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEducation Great Britain Colonies.en_US
dc.titleColonial education and class formation in early Judaism [electronic resource] : a postcolonial reading /en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
etd.degree.departmentBrite Divinity School
etd.degree.levelDoctoral
local.academicunitBrite Divinity School
local.subjectareaReligion (Brite)


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